SXSW Recap: Millennials

One of my favorite sessions (speakers were dynamic and subject is always interesting) was Solving the Millennial Content Challenge with Jason Dorsey, Chief Strategy Officer of The Center For Generational Kinetics LLC, and Joseph Gagnon, SVP/GM/Cloud Solutions of Aspect Software. Both are experts in millennials research and strategies. Their presentation was specifically focused on U.S. millennials.
First, there were so many facts given about millennials. Here are some:

  • Millennials are those born in years 1977 through 1995. They are categorized in these years because they can process the 9/11 event.
  • By 2017, millennials will outspend baby boomers.
  • Millennials are the generation with the least established loyalty because for most big purchases, they haven’t had the opportunity to make a decision again. You can’t lose loyalty if you’ve never had it.
  • Millennials have the most diverse generation. They don’t see diversity until it’s absent.
  • Millennials are accomplishing societal “norms” (such as marriage) 3-5 years later than expected. By certain ages, they have different accumulated life experiences than previous generations.

Continue Reading…

SXSW Recap: Top Event Branding

SXSW Mophie Rescue
Today I’m over on my lifestyle blog, Fearless Captivations, recapping the top event branding features I saw at SXSW. I went into SXSWi with my marketing mindset and was enthused by the ways companies presented their brand to stand-out and create buzz.

Head over to FearlessCaptivations.com to find out what I saw.

Want to read my other SXSW Recap posts?

SXSW SouthBites Recap: Food Criticism Today

The second SXSW SouthBites session I went to was Food Criticism in the Digital Age with Alison Cook, restaurant critic at The Houston Chronicle; Helen Rosner, features editor at Eater; Jonathan Gold, food writer at the Los Angeles Times; and Moderator Evan Kleiman of Kcrw Good Food.The panel started out with the question: “In this age of Yelp, is everyone a critic or are we all just sharing our opinions?”

Gold mentions the phrase “glorious noise of specialists” to describe the online reviewers and bloggers that write about restaurants and food. The “noise” is just an amplified version of what was already there. It’s a new avenue to express opinions. Instead of snail mail, platforms were created to give consumers a different kind of voice and snail mail has become email.Another big subject was food bloggers vs. food critics. The panel stated that their wealth of knowledge and context is different. Backed by the legacy of their publication, critics have a way of doing things that includes visiting the restaurant at least 2-3 times and going under a fake name. Critics put chefs, restaurants, and food movements into context. They know the know the cultural, socioeconomic, geopolitical, agricultural backgrounds behind the dishes they’re eating. As Gold described, he knows how the current weather conditions would have on a croissant and how it would look differently. The big difference is that critics pay for all their meals. Cook argued that when you’re given free food, you’ll post something nice with no critical content and there isn’t a value framework there.

Take a look at these statistics about online reviews from a recent study.

Continue Reading…

SXSW Recap: Importance of Team

One common subject I heard in multiple SXSWi sessions was about how important the team was to the success of a company. Here are some of the quotes from different sessions:

We (social media) don’t stand apart from the newsroom. We’re part of it.
Michael Roston, Sr Staff Editor Social Media, The New York Times; Social Media: Breaking News or Fixing News?

Find people who want to be a part of the magic and see your vision.
Chris Wink, Co-Founder & Chief Creative Officer, Blue Man Group; Using Brands to Create Cultural Identity

I have a bigger goal than the food. It’s providing creative challenge and financial success for employees.
David Chang, Owner/Founder, Momofuku; The Future Role of Tech in Dining and Food

When you’re a medium start-up, it’s no longer all about you. You also have to think about users, employees, investors, media and competition. You deeply care about the interests of these people and try to align the interests.
Culture is more important than the product. The product is the product. Culture is the next hundred products.
Phil Libin, CEO, Evernote; Be Epic: The Art of Bold Decision Making Continue Reading…

SXSW SouthBites Recap: Technology in Dining

momofuku

This was the second year for the SXSW SouthBites program, which connects food artisans, the food industry and technology. Basically, it’s to talk about the culinary industry! One of the sessions I went to was The Future Role of Tech in Dining and Food with David Chang, the owner and founder of Momofuku and Matt Buchanan, the editor of The Awl.

David Chang started his session out with a bang, claiming the Internet is what killed food and that chefs are losing their individuality. Ideas, restaurant reviews, and recipes are shared widely on the Internet, changing the way we think about food, experience restaurants and judge our experiences. I can definitely see what Chang means by this. Before I step into a restaurant, I know how cool the restaurant is supposed to look, what dishes I’m supposed to order, and how many stars my peers are giving it. I have increased expectations. I’ve lost some of the spark in the experience. We may have had this naturally by word of mouth, but the Internet has expanded it. Chefs are copying each other based on what’s hot. (Remember the cronut craze?!) I think the Internet is great for getting new ideas and expanding on those ideas. Whether or not it’s affecting chef creativity? I can see how that could be but I don’t have enough knowledge to be sure. What do you think?

In discussing how tech can help restaurants and the dining experience, Chang asked: how can restaurants collect data better (i.e. have their own data instead of using a third party like OpenTable) and how can tech make waiting in line disappear (referencing Franklin BBQ, its consistent line and how amazing it is). Great ideas and I have a feeling tech in the culinary industry will grow to make culinary experiences better and operations easier.

I didn’t know anything about David Chang before this panel but I’ve enjoyed treats from Momofuku Milk Bar. Throughout this panel, I felt he was very genuine, honest, team-focused and forward-thinking. He knows what he’s doing and why he’s doing it, although to him, it looks like he’s figuring it out as he goes. He said he got into the business to cook and that it wasn’t about the money. That’s why he’s opening a small fast food fried chicken restaurant soon. Because he likes fried chicken! He also said that some restaurants, like Franklin BBQ, are better because they care. They’re meticulous about the process and the product. And lastly, he’s humble in saying that he’s made a lot of mistakes along the way and it’s a bummer the Internet is changing how we do things. It’s taking away much of the trial and error. I’ll leave you with this inspiration from Chang: “Out of the ashes, something awesome could happen.”

SXSW Recap: Brands & Cultural Identity

I was excited to attend SXSWi through work and have had so many reflections and thoughts on the ideas I heard in keynotes and panels. I’ll be sharing what I learned at SXSWi, focusing on specific themes, over the next couple of weeks. To begin the recapping, I’d like to share the key things I took away from the session ‘Using Brands to Create Cultural Identity,’ which was led by Chris Wink, Co-Founder & Chief Creative Officer of The Blue Man Group, and Jarret Myer, GM at Woven & CEO of UPROXX.

What is branding?
It’s the combination of employee buy-in, the product, the marketing, and the performance of the company over time.
Your product must live up to the vision. Find others who understand your vision and are willing to work with you to bring it to life. Find pieces of evidence of progress and share them. Take your journey seriously because eventually others will too. Make sure everything is authentic. Continue Reading…